My House Rabbit

My House Rabbit's Bunny Blog

Posts Tagged ‘Rabbit Stories’

Story of a Runaway Rabbit

Sunday, November 27th, 2011

Beasley the bunny

It was near midnight on a rural road in New Jersey when Sharon Coughlin caught a glimpse of a fluffy white object at the side of the road. She drove on, but the thought of an animal possibly in need nagged at her.

“I made a U-turn and slowly drove up to the white fluffy object. My headlights shone on it. It did not move. I pulled off to the side of road and got out of the car.

“It was a rabbit! A tan and white rabbit. It was just sitting there, apparently uninjured, looking terrified. I love animals, but knew little about rabbits. I wasn’t sure how to pick it up or how it would react, but I knew I had to rescue the little guy.”

You can read the full story at The Great Animal Rescue Chase website. This site features articles submitted by people all over the world who have a rescue story (big or small) to share.

Revised Edition of Rabbits: Gentle Hearts, Valiant Spirits Available Soon

Wednesday, May 4th, 2011

Rabbits: Gentle Hearts, Valiant SpiritsMarie Mead’s Rabbits: Gentle Hearts, Valiant Spirits, a beautiful book filled with uplifting stories about rescued rabbits, has gotten even better!  A revised edition, being released this month, contains five new stories and two new articles.

From the author:

The impetus behind the revision is the excellent article titled “Modeling Love and Respect for a Classroom Rabbit,” written by elementary teacher Cheryl Rosemary Abbott. It provides interesting, down-to-earth guidance for teachers—and parents—about introducing children to a rabbit, bunny-proofing, rules for everyone’s safety, and the all-important issue of role-modeling love, respect, and responsibility.

You can purchase the book from the publisher or from Amazon.

To learn more about the book, visit:

Nova Maris Press
Celebrating Rabbits

Rabbit Stories: Growly Rowley

Wednesday, April 20th, 2011
Rowley the rabbit

Rowley the rabbit. Photo: Eloise Jonas.

Here’s an excerpt of a sweet story in the SF Gate about a temperamental, yet artsy house rabbit named Rowley:

Ten years ago, when Eloise Jonas and Frank White saw the handsome rabbit named Einstein at San Francisco Animal Care & Control, they also caught the warning on his cage: “For experienced rabbit handlers only.”

Seemed the sweet-faced bunny had bitten everyone at the shelter, except, that is, for the supervisor – proof of the intelligence promised by his name. Partly out of concern that the naughty 1-year-old wouldn’t find a home and mostly because he was quite the looker, the smitten San Francisco couple adopted the bunny and renamed him Rowley.

Read full story at the SF Gate »

Adoption Story: Bunnicula

Monday, March 21st, 2011
Bunnicula - large New Zealand rabbit

Bunnicula, a large New Zealand rabbit, was the subject of the Rabbit Advocate's winning adoption story.

To celebrate Petfinder’s Adopt the Internet Day, the Rabbit Advocate (a blog run by an HRS educator) hosted a contest for the best rabbit adoption story.

The winning story came from Kelly S. in Boston, who volunteered at a local shelter and watched as a large white bunny waited and waited for her turn to be adopted.

“Everything changed when Bunnicula, a large New Zealand rabbit, was brought to the shelter. The sign on the window of her cage stated that her previous owners no longer had time to care for her. I opened the door to her cage that first day and Bunnicula hopped right over to me, giving my hand a little nudge to let me know she wanted attention.”

Read the full story at the Rabbit Advocate »

My Buddy Buka

Saturday, July 3rd, 2010

by P.A. Smith, Co-Editor

Buka the rabbit

Buka joined our family way back in 1996. We didn’t know much about his origins or how old he was when he came home with us. All we knew was that he was purchased as an Easter gift at either a fair or a flea market – some venue like that. As a gift he was not wanted – no one was willing to take home and care for a rabbit. With a little begging and big hearts, we convinced our parents to take him home.

We drove home with Buka in the wooden crate he was purchased in. We had no idea how to feed and care for a bunny, but we knew he was going to be a part of our family. At home we gave him a bit of lettuce and left him the crate, which was closed with a piece of wire. The next time we checked on him he was sitting on top of the crate, ears up, surveying the living room.

We called him ‘Bunny’ and ‘Bunny Boy’ (even though we had no idea what his gender was) and ‘Buka.’ There was no official naming session. We still call him variations of all three names. I’ve taken to just calling him Bu. He responds to any of several names. Like everyone else in my family he is burdened with many nicknames.

We learned, mostly through trial and error, how to raise a house rabbit. We learned that iceberg lettuce is not good for rabbits. We learned that rabbits love to chew, especially lamp cords. We got him a cage and, at first, kept him in there at night. He hated being cooped up. He would rattle the door until someone opened it. We soon learned that Buka would be fine on his own hopping around while we slept.

We also learned that Buka had a playful personality that has come to define his role in the family. He loved to rocket down the hall into an open bedroom and looping around under the bed and zooming back out. He loved to do figure eights around my legs while I stood in the dining room.  We made up games together like ‘Chase.’ Buka would start on one end of the living room while I stood in the middle. He would then run full speed while I feigned trying to catch him. He’d get to the other side and plot out his return. Buka had boundless energy.

Buka has been a constant in our lives. He was there when I graduated from high school, when I graduated from college, moved out, finished graduate school. He has been a happy presence and a part of the family. Always there for when I visit home. Always happy for a cheek rub.

Old friends ask how he is when we talk. Visitors to my parents’ house seek him out to say hello. He’s a celebrity – a novelty in a world of cats and dogs.

These days Bu is showing his age. Fourteen is very, very old for a rabbit. Old age has set upon him with heartbreaking swiftness. He doesn’t run anymore. He can no longer hop onto my parents’ bed to tell my mother it’s time to greet the morning.

Today I was on my way to work when I got a call from my mom. My parents are away and had received a call from my sister. Buka couldn’t move one of his paws. I stopped by the house to check on him. He looked uncomfortable and stiff, but was alert. He turned when I called him and leaned into a cheek rub. I had Abi come down to check on him because I had to head to work and could only stay a minute.

He was up and hopping with all four paws when she got there. He was eating normally, picking out the tastiest pellets.

I suspect he’s developed arthritis. It’s heartbreaking to see him in any pain.

I advised my sister, as I would any rabbit owner, to take him to the vet. At best, they can give him medication to reduce inflammation and pain. At worst, well, I’d rather not think about that yet.

Edit 08/02/10: Buka was put to sleep today. We’ll miss him.

Tribute to a Therapy Rabbit

Monday, January 18th, 2010

Benjamin the therapy rabbitThe Des Moine Register recently published a piece about a therapy rabbit named Benjamin who helped many people at Iowa Methodist Medical Center in Des Moines. He died earlier this month at age 10.

Here’s an excerpt from the article:

Ann Bernabe lives in the same apartment building as Toombs. She has a story about Benjamin the Bunny: Bernabe’s grandson was admitted to the hospital several years ago with meningitis. His right side was paralyzed. Anderson brought her rabbit into the boy’s room, day after day after day, and placed Benjamin on the boy’s left side. The boy was told he was allowed to pet Benjamin only with his right arm.

Little by little, the boy started using his right side again.

For the full story, see the Des Moines Register.

A New Beginning for Domestic Violence Victim and Her Pet Rabbit

Tuesday, December 15th, 2009

USA Today published a very touching story about a woman who fled from her abusive husband with nothing but her rabbit (named Ruby Angel). She had been living on the streets since October.

Below is an excerpt from the article:

She’d found a place to hole up. There was no heat or running water, but there was a roof and four walls. The gashes and bruises from the last beating were beginning to heal. She was feeling a little more secure, a little more capable of thinking ahead to more than just the next morning. But when a sudden cold snap hit, she knew there were time pressures that couldn’t be ignored. She worried the rabbit — her only friend, really — wouldn’t survive months of hard winter. She had to figure out a way off the streets, something more permanent.

Read the full article here at USA Today >

ruby
Ruby Angel

New Rabbit Book: Touched by a Rabbit

Wednesday, April 1st, 2009

Kathy Smith and Lucile Moore, authors of When Your Rabbit Needs Special Care, have recently released a new rabbit book. A collection of 39 stories, Touched by a Rabbit puts a spotlight on house rabbits’ unique personalities and the special bond between rabbit and rabbit owner.

Here is an excerpt from the story “A Rabbit for All Seasons” by Lisa Ivers:

Within a year she was unrecognizable as her former self. Jasper blossomed to a healthy 10 pounds, and was sporting twelve pounds six months later. At the same time she developed a very strong opinion of who she liked and disliked. When my husband went away on business, I decided to order a pizza for dinner. Imagine the delivery man’s surprise (and mine, for that matter) when a black blur of a rabbit bolted for the door, lunged at his feet and chased him to the driveway. The poor guy jumped through the open window of his car, begging me to call off my “dog.” “What kind of dog is that?! I’ve never seen ears like that on a dog!” I think I heard his testosterone levels crashing to the asphalt when I told him she was a rabbit. Granted, he didn’t get a very good look at her while he was running away…but he got a hefty tip that night.

To purchase Touched by a Rabbit, visit the rabbit-friendly retailers listed on the Touched by a Rabbit website or go to Buy Books on the Web.